bornonthebattleground:

Global Views on Morality

johncory9mm:

bornonthebattleground:

johncory9mm:

bornonthebattleground:

johncory9mm:

bornonthebattleground:

It’s a very interesting survey. Still, it kind of worries me that in the US there is still a solid 37% who thinks that homosexuality is outright UNACCEPTABLE.   

How do you feel about there being a solid 90%+ in Ghana, Egypt, Jordan, Palestinian territory, Indonesia, Uganda and Tunisia who find homosexuality outright UNACCEPTABLE in this same survey?

When the US have the same GDP and HDI as those countries, the same political regime, the same degree of freedom, we can discuss it.

I wonder if the LGBT people living in those countries feel the same way, that it’s not even worth discussing right now?

I really don’t see your point. You’re trying to switch the conversation and try to make me look like the bad guy because I don’t care about queer people in those countries. When it clearly wasn’t my point.
And you failed to mention Russia, which is surely more politically relevant. And still, it worries me less than what americans think. Because what americans think, like it or not, for bad or good, influences the rest of us.

The point I was making is that you singled out the US in your initial post as being worrisome in regards to having 37% of the population who find homosexuality as unacceptable when more than half of the nations polled have 50% or more saying this, and seven nations have more than 90% of their population who find homosexuality unacceptable. 

The United States is among the nations making the greatest strides to accept homosexuality and same-sex marriage, yet you criticize them while giving a pass to nations much worse.

Russia is doing very poorly, not as bad as Ghana, Egypt, Jordan, Palestinian territory, Indonesia, Uganda and Tunisia, but bad nonetheless. Spain, Germany, France Czech Republic, Canada, Britain, Australia and Italy are doing particularly well. 

I’m just adding a little context to your statement.

No, sorry, but you are not adding context. Quite the contrary. First of all, I provided the link so that anyone, as you did, could see for himself, it would have been unfair to just comment without providing the source. Second, when I look at a country, in any regard, I compare it to its equals. Do you measure your life expectancy with Ghana’s, of Egypt’s or Uganda? Or do you compare it to Europe’s? If you wanted to make a valide argument, you should have mentioned Russia, and Japan, which is also quite worrisome. Do you say to yourself that you are doing well based on the fact that absolute poverty is higher in those countries? I don’t think so.

It’s not that I don’t care about lgtba people in those countries. Ironically, I just discussed a thesis about Uganda and Egypt. But I know those societies, and I’m prepared for those results. I don’t like them, I fight along the people trying to change things, and there is some change. But I kinda of expected the numbers to be like that. I wasn’t prepared for the 37% of the US. AND BECAUSE of the things you said. Because of all the achievements made. In Italy we don’t even have a law to recognize same sex couples, sigh. Because our politicians are insanely coward. Still, the number surprised me, in a good way, for once in history. The US number worries me (and I said “kind of worries me”) because, cultural-wise and civil rights wise, the US are still an important benchmark for the rest of the world, and right now human rights are under attack from the new economic powers, like Russia and China. It wasn’t a criticism, it was a realization of the fact that there is still work to do, and that american society is more fractured than you might think. A thing that sometimes I forget. I wouldn’t have said that it worries me, if not out of my respect fot the US. That’s what you’re probably missing from the equation :)

Fair enough, though I think the major factor which neither of us has mentioned here is the influence of religion, particularly Christianity and Islam. 

I think if you let something become so “sacred”, that another group of humans wearing it instills anger and hatred inside of you, you have a serious problem.

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

johncory9mm:

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

johncory9mm:

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

paradisebythe-dash-boardlight:

I think the idea behind Cultural Appropriation is racist.

You assume that people have to have a specific look or skin colour to be part of a faith, and that if you do follow the faith, you’re racist for following the culture associated with it, if you do not match the stereotypical look.

What, now that you’re called out on [a] not even knowing what dehumanization is or how it works (btw for the not willfully ignorant dehumanization is not based on the person’s intent, just like racism) and [b] being an ableist shitdick you’re going to change your argument? 

AND you’re layering your strawmen now? The problem with appropriation never has and never will be rooted in personal offense (though the people in the culture in question are always within their rights to feel that way), but rather in the measurable harmful effect and impact of the appropriation on the people in the culture and tradition. Misrepresenting my argument once wasn’t good enough, I guess.

You can piss and moan regarding being an ignorant twit about literally every topic you (pathetically) try to discuss, but I’m sorry, you just come off as a insolent child. 

And please, you’re trying to call others racist when you actively dehumanize black people? How can you hold such an extremely blatant cognitive dissonance in your head without breaking the atomic bonds that hold your cells together? PUH-lease.

Don’t even bother responding. It’ll just be more logical fallacies, more hypocrisy, more ignorance, more stupidity. My time is far too precious to be spent on your pathetic ass. 

I have no problem with people being offended, I’m just pointing out that their offense is based on their own racism. If a person chooses to be offended because they don’t like the color of the skin of someone wearing a bindi, I’m fine with them bitching about it. Just don’t expect me to respect their racism.